Tiny House couple: What is it really like sharing a small space?

We are a “Tiny House Couple.” What does that mean? Well, we’ve been living in a 125 square foot tiny house for the past year and a half, and we haven’t killed each other… yet.

tiny house coupleIn honor of Valentine’s Day, we interviewed each other with our most frequently asked “relationship” questions.

We get A LOT of questions from our followers about living in a tiny house as a couple. So, in honor of Valentine’s day, we decided to answer those questions! We interviewed each other and filmed it for your viewing pleasure.

A few questions we asked each other in the interview:

  • What do you do when you fight?
  • What is the BEST part about living in a tiny house with someone else?
  • What is the WORST part about living in a tiny house with someone else?
  • How has living tiny changed your relationship?
  • What is the ideal Valentine’s day gift for a tiny houser?

What is it really like, being a tiny house couple?

We consider our relationship to be normal and, at times, a bit goofy. Sure, we live in a tiny house, but we don’t believe a house will make or break a strong relationship. If you really love and cherish your partner, it shouldn’t matter if you live in a shoebox or a mansion.

THGJ Hirtle's Beach - 0020Love & the space between

Consider the space you put between yourself and the people you care about. There are couples that live completely separate lives, inside the same house. Do you really need two TV rooms, two offices, and his & her bathrooms? What happens when your daily routines drift apart? Togetherness is not always easy, but it’s important. Strengthen your bond by sacrificing “the space between.”

Key West - 0005Tips for living in a tiny house with your significant other

  1. Respect each other. This is important in all relationships, but especially in a tiny house.
  2. Know your limits (and your partner’s). Some people require more privacy than others. Know your limits and give your partner the space they need. Recognize what causes stress in your partner and be honest about your own irritations. You can gift each other space, even in a tiny house. Run an errand and let your partner have the house to themselves for a few hours. It can make all the difference.
  3. Say thank you. It’s always important to show appreciation.
  4. Split the chores. Just like in any home, assign yourself specific chores and divide the tasks equally.
  5. Learn to laugh. In a tiny house, sometimes you need to laugh at your problems. When you take a step back and recognize the benefits you are getting from the lifestyle, those problems will melt away. Look up #tinyhouseproblems for a good chuckle.

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Try out a tiny house for the weekend

If you are considering being a “tiny house couple,” try renting a tiny house for the weekend. Of course, you can also spend time outside. Consider your tiny house weekend as an experiment for your future lifestyle. After the weekend is over, ask yourself: did the experiment bring you closer together or farther apart?

Humans are extremely adaptable creatures. Once you commit yourself fully to living a tiny house, the transition will be easier than you expected.

Could you live in a tiny house with your significant other?

9 thoughts on “Tiny House couple: What is it really like sharing a small space?”

  1. *giggling…a few tears slip out* I think it’s interesting that the things that annoy you in a tiny house are the things that annoy me while living in a large house. We don’t argue about how to fold laundry, but putting things away – my hubby HATES that with a passion; putting anything away. If the space were smaller, there wouldn’t be that much to put away, right? 🙂

  2. Hey guys! I have been following you for a while now but it’s my first comment. Thanks for posting!

    I am currently living in a 170sq feet tiny house in Belgium with my partner and our 1-year-old son and we are designing the plans for our next house. It is going to be a bit more spacious – even though it can never be as big as some tiny houses in the US as in Europe they have to be light in order to be allowed on the road, as Bruno the French told you (he built our house, by the way! Right before starting his company). And guess what? I am a bit anxious to move to something bigger. We are used to have everything close to us and to be able to talk to each other from any corner of the house. The next house is planned to have a full closed loft… having two rooms sounds almost creepy now! Haha. So yeah, it has been so easy to adapt to tiny living (as you said, easier than expected!). Another thing is that a few years ago we would NEVER have imagined that we would be able (and happy) to live in a tiny house. So my point is that while tiny living may indeed work better for some couples than others, it also depend on the dynamic of the relationship, wich evolves as time goes on.

    People who are not used to tiny living tend to imagine it as two people stuck in a small space and facing each other all day… Gosh no! When we argue, one of us just goes for a walk – which turns to be a great way to feel chilled again. We also have our own spaces. Even when you live in a tiny tiny house, it’s possible to dedicate a small space to each person, a space that nobody tells you how to do things and where you can leave your own stuff all day. My partner has a desk with all his music and books, while my quarters are in the loft, and our son’s place is in his crib downstairs, which also serves as playpen when he is not playing around.

    Have a good tiny house day!

  3. Been following and backtracking your blog for a while…from the building to tiny house tours. Love it, love you guys! I had to comment finally because it’s so refreshing to see you two in a very human ‘average joe and joe-ette’ light. So entertaining! The blog is also beautiful and informative. Thanks for the adventure and fun!

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