Lifestyle / Tiny House Profiles

Laura & Rory’s Little Blue Vancouver Tiny House

Laura and Rory’s tiny home is one of the most well-thought spaces we’ve seen yet! Their gambrel roofline expands the interior living space without compromising aesthetic. Read on for personal stories, photographs and a video tour of this gorgeous Vancouver tiny house.

Laura and Rory's Tiny House Vancouver BC Canada - 0003

“The size of a tiny house is great to take on when you don’t have any build experience.” – Laura

Vancouver Tiny HouseVancouver Tiny House

Vancouver’s housing market has skyrocketed in recent years, causing residents to look into alternatives. Laura and Rory decided to design and build a tiny house as an affordable alternative to purchasing a standard home in the city. After building for one year, they began the search for their ideal parking location.

After advertising on Craigslist, Laura and Rory found what they thought was the perfect parking spot in Vancouver. They moved in, but before long they received a “tiny house eviction.” A neighbor complained, and there seemed to be no easy solution. He wanted the tiny house gone, and Laura and Rory were forced to tow their tiny home away.

Watch the video tour:

After working so hard for their dream, a tiny house eviction is heartbreaking.

Luckily, everything worked out for the best for Laura and Rory. They found a new parking spot, located just south of downtown Vancouver. The location is private and surrounded by a blueberry farm! They have electrical and water hookups from the property’s main house. In return, they pay a small rental fee for the parking space.

Read about our own Tiny House Eviction experience.

Vancouver Tiny House

Laura and Rory’s tiny house costs them $30,000 CAD in materials. For more on the reality of tiny house costs, click here.

Features of Laura & Rory’s Vancouver Tiny House:

  • Gambrel roofline, which expands the space
  • Custom trailer that allowed for building over the wheel wells
  • Stained glass window that was made by Rory’s Grandfather over 20 years ago
  • Convertible large couch with comfortable seating for four
  • Full shower stall, bathroom sink and compost toilet
  • Concrete kitchen countertop, custom made by Rory
  • Full refrigerator, stovetop and oven
  • Office space
  • Compact washing machine that plugs into their kitchen sink. If interested, check out Haier washers here.
  • Custom storage staircase

Vancouver Tiny House

Vancouver Tiny House

Vancouver Tiny House

Laura and Rory’s advice for finding parking in Vancouver:

Talk about your tiny house with others. Conversations often turn into opportunities!

Get the word out! Tap into the local Tiny House community. Join online forums and attend local tiny house events in your area. Tiny housers have each other’s backs!

Advertise on Craigslist.org. Laura and Rory found their current parking spot by advertising online with photos of their adorable house.

Have a backup plan. Rory suggested having a list of alternative parking spaces, just in case.

Vancouver Tiny House

“It was always Rory’s dream to live in a one room house!” Laura chuckles. “And we did it!”

It’s been almost five months since Laura and Rory moved their tiny house to its new location on the blueberry farm. They’re finally able to enjoy their tiny house dream. So far, they’re loving it!

More info: Laura & Rory’s tiny house website

Related article: Zee’s Funky Tiny House Classroom in Vancouver

11 thoughts on “Laura & Rory’s Little Blue Vancouver Tiny House

  1. Is this still not a neighbor’s phone call away from eviction?
    I would have painted it a more discrete color.

  2. I’m trailer shopping and I’m still shocked at the fact that they customized AND imported a trailer for a total of 4300. How? Where? Iron eagle brand. I have contacted manufactures directly and am not coming in much under 8k. Couldn’t find the size here. I’m looking for a 28′ trailer.

  3. Pingback: Couple's "Blueberry" Tiny House on Wheels

  4. we also have a Gambrill roof, did the “foam it green” insulation. Almost ready to put the wood finishes on the ceiling. I was wondering about he wood joists that hold the gambrill roof together, if it would be ok if we trimmed them to be flush with the wood? there is like a three inch overhang. and as we all know three inches in a tiny house is like three feet!
    thanx so much!

    • I’m not qualified to give you a solid answer, but here’s my feeling. Trusses are designed a certain way for a reason… Not sure where you got yours, how they were designed and how they were made, but I’d be very careful before removing material from a structural element… Unfortunately, I’m not sure anyone can really give you an legit answer unless they’ve been to your build and know how the trusses were designed.

      • yeah, that’s what I was thinking also. but I figured I would just put it out there anyway! thank you!

  5. I’m glad someone else is embracing the gambrel roof. Our roof is very similar to theirs.

    I am surprised that the didn’t place a window in the loft in addition to the skylight. The lack of a window with the tongue and groove ceiling makes it very cave-like. The use of wood in their house is fantastic and I am floored by the booth at the end. It almost makes me want to start over.

    As we finish our own build, I wonder how much of their stuff is in their vehicle during the tour. This isn’t a shot at them or at their commitment to the lifestyle. I just think about how some of the tinyhousers you interview seem to freeze life for filming. I wonder what they would look like if you popped in on a rainy Sunday. Great Film, maybe we will be in one someday.

    • Great comment! The belongings during a tour is something we always wonder about in a way, but it would make sense that they would want their house to look sharp given that potentially tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of people will see the video… On the other end, we met many tiny housers that do live like that, making sure stuff is put away all the time. Jenna is like that while I’m a bit more of a slacker 😛

  6. Wow – thanks for this. I explored and started designing a tiny in Vancouver but let the project go because of issues around where to put it. Real estate is expensive and by-laws extensive. One project I followed ended up in a noisy trailer park for $1100/ mo. Nice to a see a way they made it work.

    There is high profile container-home projects underway, but those are stacked and homeless oriented.

Leave a Reply